Fine Art Textiles Award

I am thrilled that my Apple Vessels 1-5 have been shortlisted for the Vlieseline Fine Art Textiles Award at the Festival of Quilts. These vessels were made using paper yarn, hand stitched around apples, which were then allowed to dry and shrink within. They are stained with ink made from apple wood and were inspired by bird-pecked fruit on the autmnal allotment, often leaving ‘vessels’ of just skin and core.

The Fine Art Textiles Award will be on show at the NEC 1-4 August and then will go on to the Knitting & Stitching Shows in London, Dublin and Harrogate. I also have work in Natural Selection (see previous posts). I will be giving a lecture called ‘Plotting’ at 10.30 am on Thursday 1st August about this recent work that focuses on my allotment as a source of materials and inspiration. The lecture can be booked here (listed under workshops with my name as tutor) and you can use the discount code WT2 for tickets to the show.

open studio

I will be opening my studio from 2-5pm on 25th to 27th May. I have my current work in progress in the studio, as well as work from various recent projects, books etc. All are welcome!

Find me on the top floor of 73 Bingley Road, Saltaire, Shipley, BD18 4SB. Access is through Too Nice To Use shop (formerly The Butterfly Rooms) and up the stairs. Simone and her shop are venue 18 on the Saltaire Arts Trail. My studio neighbour Hannah Lamb will also be opening her studio the same hours as me. Come on up to see us both at work.

weekly plant prints

One of the ways I am exploring and recording my allotment plot is through a series of weekly plant print books. These are small hand made, coptic bound books. Each week I gather leaves from the plot (whatever is available or things I’ve weeded or trimmed anyway) and use them to fill the pages of one of the books using botanical contact printing (or eco printing). I’ve been surprised how much variety I have managed to maintain, even through the low weeks of winter. When I started the series last summer I really wasn’t sure how much would be available at this sparse time for growth. Bramble and a few other self-sown weeds are a constant and are keeping my little pages filled as we head towards spring.

This series of 52 books will be exhibited in August as part of Natural Selection, a group exhibition at the Festival of Quilts in Birmingham. I will also be giving a lecture at 10.30 am on Thursday 1st August as part of the talks & lectures programme at the show.

Gallery openings

My exhibition Findings continues until Sunday 20th January at SNAPArts, Wakefield. This is a private gallery and there are two dates in January when it will be open, otherwise visits can be arranged by appointment (contact details in previous post). The open dates are:

Tuesday 8th Jan: 11 – 5

Sunday 20th Jan: 1 – 5

I hope to be there in the gallery on both dates and look forward to talking to visitors about the work. As well as the two groups of 60 objects shown in the images, there are framed and unframed works on show.

Findings #3

This week sees the third incarnation of my Findings. I was really pleased to be invited to show my work at SNAPArts in Wakefield and spent yesterday hanging the exhibition. It’s always interesting showing work in a new space and exploring different ways of presenting it. I’m pleased with how the work has come together, in particular the two groups of 60 objects¬†mentioned on the flyer above (I’ll post some images once the exhibition is open). The show includes a mix of work from recent projects: as well as ‘objects’ from Findings there are some of my Leaf Stitching and Rust Diaries pieces.

The exhibition opens as part of the Wakefield Art Walk on Wednesday evening. After the opening event the exhibition is open by appointment until 20th January – contact Jane to arrange a visit:

SNAPArts

Walker House

22 Bond Street

Wakefield

WF1 2QP

info@snaparts.co.uk

01924 361333

bottling colour

A few weeks ago there was a real shift in the seasons as things tipped from late summer into autumn. Since then we’ve had a number of frosts at the allotment and as a result some things suddenly faded and flopped. As well as gathering produce in for eating and preserving I have been gathering materials too and preparing what I can for storage, meaning I have a supply of colour or fibre when I need it. Various flowers have been dried and bottled up. Some are ones I know are worth keeping for future use, others are more of an experiment. I’ve also dried various plant fibres to make into cordage when I have time over the winter.

I set up a series of solar dye jars in the summer and these were eventually emptied out to reveal dyed linen squares to add to my on-going collection of colours from the plot. Sunflowers have been quite a revelation, with interesting colour from leaves and petals. I grew a mix of different coloured ones and they were really happy with the particularly hot summer we had.

 

cordage

Yesterday I pulled up the flax plants that I showed growing at the allotment in my last post. They will now dry and then be retted and processed. Last week I finally got round to processing the small amount of flax that I had grown last year in a couple of pots at home. Because they were grown in less than ideal circumstances the fibres turned out to be pretty poor quality. However, I managed to get a handful of processed fibre, which was then spun.

Despite this being a very small amount of fibre and a great deal of work to get it to that stage, it was a very satisfying thing to do. The right hand spool shown below is the spun fibre. The small ball and the left spool are spun from the ‘tow’, which is the rougher fibre separated out during the combing, or ‘hackling’, as part of the processing.

These were added to a series of cordage samples I have made using a variety of different materials from my allotment plot. This series includes lots of different plant material (leaf, bark, stem and bast) as well as plastics, cloth and paper: things either growing on the plot or found in the sheds.

These form part of my submission for the third module of my MA in Creative Practice. I’ve really enjoyed the process of getting to know the properties of each material that I’ve worked with. To a certain extent I’m starting from scratch with each new fibre, but there is also a cumulative effect of the experience of working the materials. I’ve also been surprised by some that I had low expectations of and which turned out to be much more pleasing to work with than I’d expected.

I don’t have any plans yet for what I might do next with the different cordages, that may come later. For now, the process of working with each material and getting to know its possibilities and limitations have been very rewarding. Furthermore, tied up within each bundle of ‘string’ is the experience of the place they were made: the birdsong that surrounded the making, the smell of each fibre as it passes through the fingers and the slow accumulation of local knowledge about the plot of land where they are from.

flax

Things are growing a-pace at the allotment, although it has been so very dry and warm that some plants are struggling. I sowed some flax back in early May (a bit later than intended but the spring was so cold). It has been good to see it grow and now bloom with its dainty blue flowers that only last less than a day each.

This is a very small patch of flax, which I know won’t result in much of a quantity of linen, once it has been retted, processed and spun. But it is an important part of my experiments in using gathered fibres for my MA project. Last year I grew an even smaller amount in large pots at home. I didn’t manage to process it over the autumn, so I left it dried until we had warm conditions. It has now been retted and is drying again in the green house before I can do the breaking, skutching etc. ready to hopefully spin some thread.

I have been gathering all sorts of plant fibres from my plot and using them to make cordage, including nettle fibres shown drying below. I’m really enjoying experimenting with these different materials and working at the plot when I can. You can see some of the cordage results on my instagram account here.

 

open studio

I’m really looking forward to taking part in Saltaire Arts Trail again this year on the early May bank holiday weekend: 5-7th May. The Butterfly Rooms, where my studio is, will have three studios open with ‘resident artists’ and we have a pop-up cafe this year especially for the event. I will have work on show from various recent projects, but most of importantly, this is my working studio.

We are venue 20 on the trail. There is always loads to see at this lovely annual event and Saltaire will be buzzing with art, activities and people for the three days. If you can’t make it then you can have a virtual peek at my studio here.

curious objects

Last week I installed North Atlantic Drift: Curious Objects. This exhibition uses a wonderful ‘cabinet of curiosities’ at the Old Low Light down on the fish quay in North Shields, Tyneside. The cabinet, which was designed especially for the space, sits amongst a fascinating multi-media heritage exhibition. There are many drawers of different dimensions and scales, with plinths and boxes on top.

This collection of altered found items and constructed forms are based on objects gathered from northern coastal locations of the British Isles. The materials have been subjected to the forces of North Atlantic Drift (the northern extension of the Gulf Stream); they have been shifted, displaced, scoured, tangled and fractured. Organic and man-made debris, floating on currents or shifted by water and tide, is intermingled, broken down and re-configured.

The space is filled with my altered and constructed objects until 30th June.