re-new

I am pleased to be among the participating artists commissioned by Toast in collaboration with Kettle’s Yard to re-work worn garments and waste fabrics, turning them into something new and unexpected.

The display aims to promote the idea that clothes can have a life beyond their first wearer; creatively supporting a low carbon lifestyle.

RE-NEW will be on show in the Research Space, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge 30 October – 3 November.

Fine Art Textiles Award

I am thrilled that my Apple Vessels 1-5 have been shortlisted for the Vlieseline Fine Art Textiles Award at the Festival of Quilts. These vessels were made using paper yarn, hand stitched around apples, which were then allowed to dry and shrink within. They are stained with ink made from apple wood and were inspired by bird-pecked fruit on the autmnal allotment, often leaving ‘vessels’ of just skin and core.

The Fine Art Textiles Award will be on show at the NEC 1-4 August and then will go on to the Knitting & Stitching Shows in London, Dublin and Harrogate. I also have work in Natural Selection (see previous posts). I will be giving a lecture called ‘Plotting’ at 10.30 am on Thursday 1st August about this recent work that focuses on my allotment as a source of materials and inspiration. The lecture can be booked here (listed under workshops with my name as tutor) and you can use the discount code WT2 for tickets to the show.

Gallery openings

My exhibition Findings continues until Sunday 20th January at SNAPArts, Wakefield. This is a private gallery and there are two dates in January when it will be open, otherwise visits can be arranged by appointment (contact details in previous post). The open dates are:

Tuesday 8th Jan: 11 – 5

Sunday 20th Jan: 1 – 5

I hope to be there in the gallery on both dates and look forward to talking to visitors about the work. As well as the two groups of 60 objects shown in the images, there are framed and unframed works on show.

Findings in a line

We hung Findings last week at the Ropewalk Gallery, Barton on Humber. This gallery suits my work very well in both scale and environment and I am really pleased with how the exhibition looks. Having hung this body of work on three different gallery spaces during the Knitting and Stitching Shows last year it is good to have had some time to reflect and then show it again, making a few changes to how the work is presented. There are some additions as I sold some pieces from the original show; some pieces have been re-mounted for the wall rather than being shown on plinths; my recent walking book series has been incorporated as these book structures record many of the locations that feature in the rest of the work.

This time the work hangs in one continuous line, so you can take a journey through the objects, studying each one in turn. Each individual piece is intimate in scale and the detail is all-important. Together they form a much bigger whole and I hope that they tell a story; each viewer reading a slightly different narrative.

Shall I take you on a walk around the gallery? I can’t show you every piece (there are over 200) but this will give you a good flavour of the work…

As many of you will know, there is a publication which accompanies this body of work. Findings, which has close-up images of much of the work as well as writing that links the pieces to the places that they record and essays by Nigel Morgan, is available to order here. The exhibition continues until 3rd September.

studio(s)

Alice Fox Open studio

I have recently taken a new studio, just round the corner from home, which means I can make better use of my working day. It is above The Butterfly Rooms in Saltaire and there are a few of us with studios, which are open to visit during shop opening hours and when the residents are there.

I still have a space at the Keighley Art Studios but this is mainly to store things (as the new place isn’t very big) and I am now working day to day out of the Saltaire studio.

This weekend Keighley Art Studios are opening the doors to visitors between 10am and 4pm, Saturday and Sunday. I will be there on Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday with my studio open and it will be lovely to welcome visitors there. I have lots of framed work up and there will be a variety of studio holders’ work to see: paintings, upholstery, ceramics, sculpture, prints . . . and no doubt there will be plenty of tea and cake.

The studios are in:

Unit G8, Keighley Business Centre, Knowle Mill, South Street, Keighley, BD21 1SY.

taught

Email Taught pdf invite

I have some work in this exhibition, which opens today at Bradford School of Arts & Media and runs until 27th April (Monday – Friday, 10 – 4). All are welcome to the Private View on Tuesday evening, 4 – 6.30pm.

40 Sycamore Keys

Alice_Fox_Hackfall_sycamore_keyAs I mentioned a couple of posts back, I spent my 40th birthday exploring the wonderful Hackfall woods in North Yorkshire. This special place is a historic landscape garden, which appears wild but has been manipulated by the hand of man for over 400 years. Now managed by The Woodland Trust and The Hackfall Trust, it is a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

For two whole days, from sunrise to beyond moonrise, we drank every detail of the woodland in. Walking every path, treading each 18th century step, discovering all the carefully planned vistas and more. From our precariously perched hideaway we looked down onto the steeply sloping valley, lined with a tapestry of trees recently exposed as their winter selves. The luminous larch held the light and glowed from it’s soon-to-drop yellowing needles. Walking amongst the trees we came upon the recumbent trunk of a fallen tree that had become home to a whole community of plant species: a garden where fairies might have partied, littering the populated surface of the trunk with their tattered wings. The death of majestic birds was exposed before us on the path: blood spilled and feathers strewn. The naked pink of sycamore stems caught our attention. We marvelled at hazel branches holding droplets to sparkle in the last light as the moon rose behind silhouetted boughs. And through it all the rushing river wound its noisy way; energetic always. Water is a constant in this wood: dripping, rushing, hanging, pooling, reflecting.

Alice_Fox_Hackfall_sycamore_keys_log

Those tattered fairy wings I found were sycamore keys in various states of delicate decay. I collected a few, popping them into a little jar to study later. Back in my studio I emptied out the jar and laid out the keys. Counting them I found that I had collected exactly 40. I set out to draw each one, studying the detail of their veined surface and aiming to capture something of their fragility.

Alice_Fox_40_sycamore_keys

The drawings are made in walnut ink on watercolour postcards. The ink was made from walnut husks gathered in the Yorkshire garden of a friend. The first few of the series are now posted in my shop and a donation will be made to The Woodland Trust from the sale of each drawing. My drawings are ongoing, a few a week until all 40 are made. I’ll let you know how I get on.

Alice_Fox_Hackfall_sycamore_keys_1-6

articles

AliceFox_unfinished_detail

I have had interviews and articles published in three places this week. One is here on the lovely Textile Curator website. The second is here and is part of a series of articles where Anne Williams discusses ‘unfinished’ work. Number three is an article in The Quilter, which can be viewed here. This appears in Winter 2015 issue (no. 145) of The Quilter, the quarterly membership magazine of The Quilters’ Guild of the British Isles. ‘Moving On’ follows the article I wrote for The Quilter following my bursary from the Quilters’ Guild in 2011.