Publication

One of the key aspects of this project and my involvement in it was that the lead artists would share the process of developing a piece of work with the other participating artists. Everyone has different approaches, strategies and skills for making a work of art. Understanding something of an artist’s tools can be an enriching and inspiring experience, whether they relate to the medium one works in or not.

Working ‘in residence’ in the library and having direct contact with participants was an obvious way to share experience and knowledge. Writing about the development process is accessible to those involved in the project but potentially might reach a much wider audience. The text that makes up this recent series of blogs is now transferred onto the physical page in a publication called Unknown Book, thus forming a tactile record of the project. The book is available to buy here. I have also taken the opportunity to share something of the process of putting together the publication itself.

Unknown Book is number six in an on-going series of self-published works, each one recording a specific project I have undertaken. These books are bought by people from all corners of the earth and many who haven’t seen the physical work but who are interested in knowing something of it. The books I publish are part exhibition catalogue but they also contain some sort of explanation about the processes involved in making the work. They are a means for me to share my work on a level that is beyond just presenting a ‘finished’ piece of work in a gallery.

Anyone can self-publish and that process has become very easy in recent years with various approaches, including on-demand printing. There are also different ways of promoting the self-publication and if it is something you might consider I would suggest giving that some serious thought: If you are going to spend money on producing a whole load of books you need to be confident that you can sell them. I didn’t set out to become a publisher, but after the first two books I realised it was something I wanted to continue doing and that it might become a significant part of any project I undertake. It also provides me with a ‘product’ that I can sell at a reasonable price and this takes some of the pressure off feeling that I have to make ‘sellable’ work. I bought some ISBN numbers and thus became a publisher – it sounds far grander than it actually is! You don’t have to have an ISBN number to publish but it does mean (in the UK) that the British Library and the Legal Deposit Libraries collect copies. There is a certain legitimacy associated with this, which isn’t necessary but it also means that you can claim a share of royalties via organisations such as the Design and Artists Copyright Society (if the publication includes your own images). So it costs you a bit but there are benefits.

Each time I have self-published a book I have learnt something new, which feeds into the next publication. These are some of the things I have learnt or found useful:

I have developed a relationship with a local printer who has an environmental policy I am happy with (this is something particularly important to me) and who I feel I can talk to without needing to know a huge amount about the publishing and printing industry – I can ask a stupid question and not feel stupid!

I now know the sort of paper finish I like but also what the implications of that are for my images and the environment.

I have a format that works for me and has been consistent through the different books.

I have picked up the basic skills I need to layout a book and get it how I want it to look. Keeping things simple and clear is a benefit.

I do my own photography for the books and I am always looking to learn ways to improve that.

I understand the timescale needed by the printers so I can build that into my work on a project. This means that if the book is associated with an exhibition I may need to have the publication ready to go to the printers before I have finished making the work.

I have a fairly loyal following via social media, through my blog and from exhibitions, which means that I am confident that over a period of time there will be enough demand for a new book to justify the outlay.

The experience I have gained through producing these self-published books is part of the reason I was invited to be a lead artist on this project. The different parts of my practice are all interlinked and one thing leads to another…

after the show

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I really enjoyed my time at the Knitting & Stitching Shows – what a wonderful bunch of people are involved in the whole thing, from organisers, exhibitors, logistics staff, through to the visitors. Over the three shows I have met so many lovely people and had some amazing conversations. Thank you to all who came to see the work on show.

I am now in recovery! I’m having a quiet week catching up with things at home and fighting a cold. I have just updated my online shop here with a few things that might make good seasonal gifts…

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further Findings

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The third and final Knitting & Stitching Show is on next week in Harrogate. This leg of the shows is the one I am most familiar with, having visited it for years as a punter and then more recently as a demonstrator in the wonderful Artists in Action stand. This year I won’t be demonstrating because I’ll be with my Findings gallery, TG6 in hall M.

The gallery space at Harrogate has different dimensions from the spaces I had in London and Dublin, so it will be interesting putting the work up in a differently configured space again.

I made some of my stitched limpets into brooches before the London show and they have been quite popular. There are a few on my shop here, along with some other small work. I hope to have some with me in Harrogate too.

Findings

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The autumn Knitting and Stitching Shows are upon us, with the Alexandra Palace show opening on Wednesday 5th October. My front room is full of Findings in boxes waiting to be loaded into the car and taken down to London tomorrow. There are still some unknowns about exactly how the work will fit in the space: it is impossible to test it out fully and the actual space may well feel very different to the imagined one. But careful planning means that I hope it will come together successfully over the next couple of days. As I was making the final fixings and preparations I got really quite excited about how this collection of objects will come together next week. I’m looking forward to seeing it all together on display rather than in and out of boxes in the studio.

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My Findings book, published to accompany the exhibition, arrived a few days ago and this will be available at the show along with my other titles. The new book is now on the shop and will be available to order in the next few days. I have put a page with the work list of all the items in the exhibition here. This lists titles and prices and is intended for reference whilst viewing the show or as a reminder afterwards. It isn’t possible to post images of all the work but I hope to be able to show how the exhibition looks once it is up.

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more keys

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I’m now half way through my drawing project 40 Sycamore Keys. Each time I go to the studio I start the day by doing a couple of these drawings. The latest 10 are now listed on my shop. I’m really enjoying working my way through the collection, studying and recording each one in turn.

This week I haven’t managed to get to the studio. I’ve had a great deal of administration to do, so I’ve concentrated on that and done research and reading. I find it depressing to spend a week staring at the computer screen rather than doing what feels like ‘proper’ work. However, it is all relevant stuff and next week will involve much more making.

Once again it is the time of year when Craft & Design Magazine run their Selected Makers Awards. Voting is open until the end of March. If you would like to vote for me (here) your help would be much appreciated – thank you!

 

40 Sycamore Keys

Alice_Fox_Hackfall_sycamore_keyAs I mentioned a couple of posts back, I spent my 40th birthday exploring the wonderful Hackfall woods in North Yorkshire. This special place is a historic landscape garden, which appears wild but has been manipulated by the hand of man for over 400 years. Now managed by The Woodland Trust and The Hackfall Trust, it is a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

For two whole days, from sunrise to beyond moonrise, we drank every detail of the woodland in. Walking every path, treading each 18th century step, discovering all the carefully planned vistas and more. From our precariously perched hideaway we looked down onto the steeply sloping valley, lined with a tapestry of trees recently exposed as their winter selves. The luminous larch held the light and glowed from it’s soon-to-drop yellowing needles. Walking amongst the trees we came upon the recumbent trunk of a fallen tree that had become home to a whole community of plant species: a garden where fairies might have partied, littering the populated surface of the trunk with their tattered wings. The death of majestic birds was exposed before us on the path: blood spilled and feathers strewn. The naked pink of sycamore stems caught our attention. We marvelled at hazel branches holding droplets to sparkle in the last light as the moon rose behind silhouetted boughs. And through it all the rushing river wound its noisy way; energetic always. Water is a constant in this wood: dripping, rushing, hanging, pooling, reflecting.

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Those tattered fairy wings I found were sycamore keys in various states of delicate decay. I collected a few, popping them into a little jar to study later. Back in my studio I emptied out the jar and laid out the keys. Counting them I found that I had collected exactly 40. I set out to draw each one, studying the detail of their veined surface and aiming to capture something of their fragility.

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The drawings are made in walnut ink on watercolour postcards. The ink was made from walnut husks gathered in the Yorkshire garden of a friend. The first few of the series are now posted in my shop and a donation will be made to The Woodland Trust from the sale of each drawing. My drawings are ongoing, a few a week until all 40 are made. I’ll let you know how I get on.

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leaf cubes

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I’ve updated my online shop here with some new items. Some of the stitched leaf cubes that featured in my Leaf Stitching exhibition are on there now, along with a selection of other small 3d and 2d items, books and cards. I do always have a selection of framed pieces from previous exhibitions available, as well as unframed and mounted works (textile and print), but these are not advertised on the shop. I am happy to arrange a visit to the studio (Keighley, West Yorkshire) if you are looking to buy. If you are further afield and have particular requests then do send me an email and I’d be happy to discuss options for work I have available.

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objects

I had a lovely week with my Leaf Stitching exhibition in London. Spending time with a body of work in an exhibition situation is a good time to reflect on things, both leading up to that point and looking forward. Being removed from the studio and all the distractions of home life can be useful for a period of time, even if the logistics of arranging it all are tricky! Being present in the gallery to talk to visitors about the work can be very rewarding and, I think, adds a lot to the visitors’ experience of the work. Visitors were often surprised to find that the person sitting quietly stitching in the gallery was the artist. For those that didn’t make it to the exhibition the Leaf Stitching catalogue/book is available in my shop, along with other publications. I hope to get some of the pieces that were featured in this exhibition available in the shop in coming days, along with a few other items for sale.

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Tide Line, shown above, is currently showing in The Language of Objects at Unit Twelve Gallery, Staffordshire. This looks to be a really interesting exhibition with work from a great group of artists and makers. I am really pleased to have another opportunity to show work at this quirky gallery set on a farm in rural Staffordshire.

A few more workshops dates for next year have been added to the list on the workshops page. I hope to arrange some more day workshops at my studio in West Yorkshire as well, although these have to be during the middle part of the year when the temperature in the  studio is more hospitable: it is starting to get pretty cold in there already and we’re only in early autumn! Details of these will be made available when I’ve sorted out dates in the diary.

leeds artists’ book fair

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I will be at this lovely event this weekend at The Tetley, a new contemporary art gallery in Leeds. I first showed at this event last year and it was a very friendly gathering of all things book art. I’m looking forward to seeing the new venue and meeting some lovely artists’ book making/appreciating people! I’ll be taking some of my Tide Marks books along, as well as this: Forgotten HaberdasheryAlice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 3

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