shirt collar

collar arrival

A few months ago I was invited by Kathleen to be part of a group project involving some vintage shirt collars.  The brief and some of the developments can be found on the project blog here. So this is what arrived back in the summer and has been pinned to my studio board while I considered what to do with it.

Alice Fox shirt collar

Last week I finally got round to playing with this item that is sort of a ‘found object’ except it is someone else’s find. I studied it as if it were some sort of specimen, investigating its make-up, structure and features. I drew it, photographed it, took prints from it and slowly took it apart, documenting the process. At each stage I took a print, initially blind embossing (putting it through the press with damp paper and no ink). The marks it made became slowly more ragged and dis-shevelled as the edges were un-done.

Alice Fox shirt collar blind embossed print Alice Fox shirt collar deconstructing Alice Fox shirt collar rough edges

It was so pristine and white that I daren’t mark it with ink initially, knowing that once I did there would be no going back.  Eventually I plucked up the courage to do so and now the collar lies in its dissected state, flattened and black with printing ink. The prints it made have wonderful detail where the loose threads caught the ink.

Alice Fox shirt collar inkedAlice Fox shirt collar print detail

I like it as an object. It has a history and a story that I can never know. I don’t know yet what I’ll do to it next but I’m looking forward to finding out…

garden project

shadows on the verandah

Last year I was commissioned to make a special record of a garden. This record was for the occupants of the garden (and its house) for over 20 years to take with them when they move on to pastures new. There is more information about the project here and there are some images of how things developed in an album here. The final set of prints were chosen over Christmas and are now with the framer. I’m looking forward to seeing how they look as a finished series. Meanwhile, I will be bringing the experiments and developments together in a special book to go with the framed prints.

Alice Fox garden project studio table

walking, collecting, making

Holkham bay

This time last week I had just returned from a long weekend on the North Norfolk coast. I was leading a study weekend with 8 Fold, a group of textile artists who are all regulars at the Committed to Cloth studio in Surrey. We had a wonderfully stimulating and creative time and the location provided rich inspiration in terms of landscape and our beach-combing (extreme scavenging at times!). I have long wanted to visit this part of the world, partly having glimpsed elements of it through the work of Polly Binns and Debbie Lyddon.

Holkham Bay razor shell tide line

 We were blessed with the most beautiful blue skies and bright winter sunshine, giving long shadows and the perfect conditions for photography. It was very cold so our cliff-top cottage was a necessary sanctuary to warm up and the kitchen table became the focus of all sorts of experiments and explorations in rust printing, embossing, weaving, stitching, drawing… and eating, but not all at the same time! It was great to spend time with such experienced artists whose curiosity and delight in exploring place and material matched my own.

Alice Fox beach finds (Sherringham)

Needless to say, many photos were taken, and there is a selection here if you want to see more. Although the temperature wasn’t very conducive to sitting around drawing I made the most of the recent cliff falls and used the varying tones of the clay to help record my experience. As ever, there is much to process and explore as a result of this weekend and I know I’ll be feeding off it for a long time.

Alice Fox drawing with cliff-fallen clay

making marks

I had a great time at the Knitting & Stitching Show last week.  Thank you so much to Art Van Go for inviting me to be part of the Artists in Action stand.  It was a real privilege to be working alongside some established names, some of whose books sit on my studio shelves.

I met so many lovely people and spent so much time talking that I didn’t get much work done!  I kept things simple, basic mark making with found objects with some rust prints on the go.  These sparked off many conversations about the techniques I use and it was lovely to be told that I’d inspired people to go home and have a go themselves.

Here are some of the marks I made:

 

miniatures

Last week I completed three small pieces for the Miniatures exhibition at Cupola Gallery in Sheffield, which is made up of works smaller than a twenty pound note.

Here are my three framed and with detail from each:



They all are made up of a combination of rust prints, collagraph print and hand stitch, which plays about within and around the marks of the prints.

The exhibition opens on 16th March and runs until 22nd April.

sunday stitches

I’ve been stitching into some of the prints I made earlier in the week.  This one has a tea and rust print and then a collagraph print over.  There are embossed and printed marks from stitches on the collagraph plate and my little seeding stitches play about amongst those marks.  I’m really pleased with the effect and some late afternoon sunshine (it rained most of today) enabled some good photographs.