Project practicalities

I do feel it is important to consider the practicality of how and what one intends to make for a specific project. Whilst this shouldn’t limit the artistic vision, it has to be taken into account:

How am I going to deal with making something ‘in residence’ in the library (which is a couple of hours train ride from home) and then continue with that making in my own studio?

How will the piece be transported, exhibited, stored afterwards?

These may seem like boring practicalities but they are essential considerations. I have made large scale work in the past but have since worked on smaller and smaller scales. Making a number of units on an intimate scale that can then come together to make a whole that is more then the sum of their parts has benefits:

The work can be portable, so easily transferred from the studio to home (so I can carry on making whilst the supper cooks, for instance).

Progress is easily measured: if you complete one or two units in a day there is a sense of satisfaction and growth associated with that.

Storage is more straight-forward: I have all sorts of work from previous projects that was framed and then takes up the limited storage space I have in my home and studio (and my parents’ garage…).

Displaying the work can be more flexible with a number of possibilities for how pieces are arranged: whether they are wall mounted or displayed on plinths; whether they are shown in lines, grids or randomly. There is something I find really attractive and playful about this ‘open form’ sort of exhibition potential. Maybe the work could be moved about by the curator, or the viewer even.

Within the context of an exhibition in a functioning library there are a further set of considerations to be made. This is where the involvement of a curator in the project, along with understanding, supportive and imaginative library staff become necessary.

endings and beginnings

Alice Fox Printed Fragments detail

As the year draws to a close there is a kind of waiting time; a period of rest and reflection. Juggling family and work means that things are done in small portions of time, slotted in between one another. Creative activity spills over into the rest of life and vice versa: boundaries are blurred. Time in the fresh air is relished when the weather allows. New germs of ideas form unexpectedly and distract me from the projects that need finishing: exciting things to come… Happy new year.

artist in residence

I would like to introduce you to my exciting up-coming project.  I will be Artist in Residence at Spurn Point Nature Reserve during 2012.  This is something that I’ve been planning for over a year now and I’ve been itching to announce it but held off until things were a little more certain.

Although I’m still waiting for the outcome of a funding bid, I felt it was time to let you know about what I’m planning.  The project will start properly in April and run through to September, when there will be an exhibition weekend at Spurn in the old lighthouse.  There will then be a gallery tour during the following months.  More on that another time.


You can follow the project once things get going here and find out more about previous Spurn artists here.  You can also see some of the photos I took last time I visited Spurn here.

>flitting and fiddling

>It feels like I’ve been flitting between lots of different things all week.  I have a number of projects at the planning stage and, while I wait to be in a position to get stuck into any of them, I fiddle about in a slightly disjointed way. 

I finished off the warp I’d had on my loom since January, when I wove scarves for late Christmas presents.  I had hoped that there would be enough left to weave one more scarf, but I came to the end sooner than I thought.  It has made a (very) short scarf length.  I was then eager to get another warp on the loom.  I wanted to see how some British wool yarn I have would fare as a warp.  In my impatience I decided to try and make my warp using the old chairs-upside-down-on-on-the-table method.  

Things didn’t go quite to plan and I regretted my haste.  The warp was a nightmare from here on in and I now know that this wool yarn is not really suited to being a warp, as I had suspected.  

I’ve also been fiddling about with some of the leftover bits of printed felt I have from my degree project. 

>planning

>
I’m planning something new, but which will enable a return to something I love after some time away from it. It is five years since I dyed with indigo. I love blue very much and simply can’t get enough of the particular shades that come with indigo dyeing. I’m hoping that it will be just the thing for this new project.