In Residence

My first couple of days working ‘in residence’ in the library provided a really focussed period of work on the project. I brought the starting points I had developed, along with sketches, photographs and notes to show any interested participants or members of the public. The ‘big book’ was brought down from the collection to sit on my worktable and provide an important proximity to my working process.

I continued to work on the book units, having now identified the exact dimensions to make. I wasn’t working any differently to how I would in my own studio, but being in the library itself provided a focus and impetus to my making and thinking. The library had been asked to collect together any papers or books that would have been otherwise discarded so that I could potentially incorporate them into my work. The range of these was slightly disappointing, but was enough to start exploring possibilities. The lovely library staff found me a tin of old library stamps and some inkpads, which I played with on the surface of some of my book units.

About a month later I had a second residency session, again working in the library in an intensive way and exploring further the use of withdrawn publications in my book units. This time in the library also allowed for participants in the project to visit and talk about what I was doing, as well as the development of their own work for the project. That sharing of process, thinking and development between the artists involved is a key part of this whole venture. Those discussions are so important for artists to have with their peers or mentors, partly as a means of over-coming problems (that you sometimes didn’t even realise were there), but also in a spirit of support and understanding. Even just describing what you are doing or trying to achieve to someone else can solidify things in your own mind and provide a way forward or even just a confirmation that the approach you are taking is right.

 

stained

Alice Fox weave with found metal (detail)

I’m working on a series of sculptural pieces that are woven in linen, each made specifically to relate to a piece of found metal. I then manipulate the cloth so that it responds directly to the metal: encasing it, wrapping it, slotting through it etc. The metal is then allowed to stain the weave where it is in contact with the rust, with the aid of seawater.

Alice Fox weave with found metal stained

The first uses a metal pipe that I collected on Holkham Beach in Norfolk. The object is linked to the place in my mind because that is where I found it. It is therefore completely ‘of the place’ to me, even if the object has no other significant link to there: I have no idea what its history is prior to me picking it up.

Alice Fox looped weave with found metal hoop

The next piece takes a metal hoop as as starting point. The strip of tapestry weave sits gathered and looped within the hoop, extending either side.

Alice Fox weave with found metal hoop stained

The third piece is shown here just off the loom with its warp ends still waiting to be finished, but looking rather beautiful in their wild arrangement. There is a hole in the cloth, ready for its designated metal to slot into.

Alice Fox weave with hole

Each stage of the process is slow and to be savoured: the weaving by hand, beating each weft down to cover the warp; stitching each warp thread back into the weave; the staining of the cloth by the rusty metal as it dries.

folding and binding

Shirt collar books wrapped

I’ve been working on my contribution to the Shirt Collar Project and it has taken me in a direction I didn’t expect.  Pictures of the final pieces from all ten artists will be revealed over on the project blog but here are a few images of my process as it unfolded (or folded!). I didn’t expect to make book forms but having printed from my collar on to both paper and fabric I then tested various routes and this was the one that I ended up following.

Alice Fox Shirt collar prints cut upAlice Fox shirt collar book bindingAlice Fox shirt collar book folding

leeds artists’ book fair

Leeds Artist Book Fair 2014_Page_1

I will be at this lovely event this weekend at The Tetley, a new contemporary art gallery in Leeds. I first showed at this event last year and it was a very friendly gathering of all things book art. I’m looking forward to seeing the new venue and meeting some lovely artists’ book making/appreciating people! I’ll be taking some of my Tide Marks books along, as well as this: Forgotten HaberdasheryAlice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 3

Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 4

undone

Alice Fox sand marks cloths

Here is a glimpse of the un-wrapped bundles that I showed earlier in the week.  I pinned them up in my studio and have been getting to know them a little.  The marks can be so surprising and sometimes so very subtle, while other times really strong.  I love the creases and folds that remain from how the bundle has been bound and from what it has been bound round. They are like the ridges and dips left in wet sand twice a day when the tide recedes.  These three-dimensional elements have dictated what I do next: some are left exactly as they are, some are stitched to a backing to preserve the creases, some are ironed because the marks are more important than the creases.  The decision making is quite organic: I can have a plan of what I’m aiming for but really the piece is dictated by what happens along the way.

This group (with one other piece) are called Sand Marks.  They will hang as a group but will be staggered so that they sit together as one, balancing each other.  I’m looking forward to seeing them completed.

Alice Fox Sand Marks cloths in studio