shirt collar

collar arrival

A few months ago I was invited by Kathleen to be part of a group project involving some vintage shirt collars.  The brief and some of the developments can be found on the project blog here. So this is what arrived back in the summer and has been pinned to my studio board while I considered what to do with it.

Alice Fox shirt collar

Last week I finally got round to playing with this item that is sort of a ‘found object’ except it is someone else’s find. I studied it as if it were some sort of specimen, investigating its make-up, structure and features. I drew it, photographed it, took prints from it and slowly took it apart, documenting the process. At each stage I took a print, initially blind embossing (putting it through the press with damp paper and no ink). The marks it made became slowly more ragged and dis-shevelled as the edges were un-done.

Alice Fox shirt collar blind embossed print Alice Fox shirt collar deconstructing Alice Fox shirt collar rough edges

It was so pristine and white that I daren’t mark it with ink initially, knowing that once I did there would be no going back.  Eventually I plucked up the courage to do so and now the collar lies in its dissected state, flattened and black with printing ink. The prints it made have wonderful detail where the loose threads caught the ink.

Alice Fox shirt collar inkedAlice Fox shirt collar print detail

I like it as an object. It has a history and a story that I can never know. I don’t know yet what I’ll do to it next but I’m looking forward to finding out…

garden project

shadows on the verandah

Last year I was commissioned to make a special record of a garden. This record was for the occupants of the garden (and its house) for over 20 years to take with them when they move on to pastures new. There is more information about the project here and there are some images of how things developed in an album here. The final set of prints were chosen over Christmas and are now with the framer. I’m looking forward to seeing how they look as a finished series. Meanwhile, I will be bringing the experiments and developments together in a special book to go with the framed prints.

Alice Fox garden project studio table

streams of stitches

Alice Fox Sand Streams #3 detail

I’ve been finishing off various bits of work for Tide Marks.  With less than two weeks to go until the opening it is finishing touches time.  Amongst the work are five paper pieces with embossing and stitching on a scale that I’ve not attempted before.  Stitching into paper this size (70 x 50 cm) provides certain challenges but I’ve worked away methodically at my kitchen table with the autumn light changing rapidly as the weather flits between sunshine and showers, the now cold wind carrying animated leaves past my window.  This has been a more attractive place to work than my studio of late.  I miss the eye onto the outside when I’m there.

These pieces are subtle, quiet.  They change massively with the light: sometimes the embossed lines and stitches catching dark shadows so they look like drawn marks; sometimes the whole piece looking flat and empty.  The space that appears empty from a distance is full of detail when you’re close.  Space can be scary: it is tempting to fill it up, but just like silence that can be beautiful I hope the spaces can be too.

Alice Fox Sand Streams #5 stitch detail

erosion

Alice Fox Spurn Cloth #2 take down with assistant

I took down my installation at The Bowery last weekend (with the help of my small assistant).  It was potentially a rather sad day as the paper pieces that I’d collaged directly onto the wall were going to have to be scraped off.  I didn’t know whether they would come off in salvageable pieces or if the whole thing would break up.  I had resolved myself to this site specific piece (the paper extension to my linen Spurn Cloth #2) being an ephemeral work and likened it to the erosion and change that is happening constantly at Spurn, where the pieces were based on.

Someone suggested I should have filmed the process of putting the installation up, building up the collage on the wall – great idea, but I’d already put it up when they suggested it!  So I decided to record the taking down instead.  Here is the result, although the quality isn’t great it gives an idea of how the pieces surrounded you in the gallery (the first half is shots taken from the middle of the room looking round the walls and then it goes back the other way tracking the removal of the work and leaving an empty gallery again.

 

forgotten haberdashery

Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book

Hebden Bridge Rag Market are holding a summer exhibition on the theme ‘haberdashery’, with 20 artists work displayed in 20 shop windows during July.  My book Forgotten Haberdashery is one of those 20.  This features marks made by rusty pins from a rusty round tin, prints from scraps of lace and yarn, an old button, vintage silks and an abandoned needle. I’ve used rust prints, collagraph print, embossing, monoprint, screen print, chine colle, and stitch (gosh, that sounds a lot but the surfaces are actually quite subtly built up).  I’m looking forward to hearing where it has ended up…

Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 3Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 4Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book detail 7Alice Fox Forgotten Haberdashery book closed

print passion

Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 5

I taught the first in a run of workshops last Saturday at the lovely PASH north of York.  This wonderful old flax mill is full of things in various states of rustiness and repair, so it was a perfect venue for a workshop focusing on making marks with rusty things.  We had the luxury of a wealth of interesting items to use in our experiments as well as those that we’d brought along ourselves.

Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 17

Here’s what we got up to:

Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 6Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 8Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 11Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 12Alice Fox Rust Marks workshop 14This workshop is part of a celebration of different print techniques that is on at PASH until the end of June, called Passion for Print.  This includes an exhibition of work from a number of artists working with print in different ways and a series of workshops too.

frugal acts

Alice Fox Notes on the back of an envelope page detail

I’ve been playing about with old envelopes and have made a series of small note books using them.  I’ve always loved the patterns you get on the inside of many envelopes and often keep them ‘just in case’ they might be of use.  Now I’ve found a way of using them and giving them another life.  I’ve enjoyed playing with some of the printed marks on them, deliberately including bits of text, stamps and those little windows that allow you to see the address on the letter inside.

Alice Fox Notes on the back of an envelope inside found text

I’m reading Roger Deakin’s Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees at the moment.  Anyone who reads this blog regularly will know I’m a fan of nature writing and there is a pile of such books permanently on my bed-side table, either waiting to be read or ready for me to dip back into a favourite section.  There is a chapter where Deakin describes visiting the artist Margaret Mellis, which I read the other day.  Because he is focusing on trees and wood he is particularly interested in Margaret’s use of driftwood for her sculptures or assemblages. He also describes her drawings made on opened out envelopes and he makes an observation that really struck a chord with me:

Letters, like driftwood and ideas, arrive out of the blue.  They are gifts.  The envelopes, like the driftwood, had a former life, and would generally be discarded.  Mellis gives them new status and a function.  Ingeniously reusing an envelope, or driftwood, to make a picture is, in the context of environmental politics, a deliberately frugal act. Both were once trees, and what would otherwise have been wasted is turned to good use. (p 188).

The phrase ‘a deliberately frugal act‘ has stayed with me since I read it as I know that many of the decisions I make both in my life in general and in my artistic practice are just that.  I am excited by the possibilities of the found or discarded object and see it as a challenge to make use of them.  If by doing so I can reduce the consumption of new materials that is another challenge met.  This doesn’t mean I won’t use new materials but I am always considering carefully how and when I do.

I’m currently preparing for a series of workshops over the next month introducing people to printing and dyeing with rust.  I am gathering collected rusty things as well as a range of materials on which to make our rusty marks.  Fittingly, the first of these workshops next weekend will be held in a salvage yard.  I’ll let you know what we find and how we get on.  If you fancy making some notes on the back of an envelope then the little books are available here.

gifts

Alice Fox Gifts from the Pavement print textures detail

I’ve been working quietly away at my exhibition for Saltaire Arts Trail.  This time next week the event will be in full swing and the ‘village’ of Saltaire will be buzzing with people of all ages, inspired energy and a plethora of different art experiences for visitors to sample. One of these will be my exhibition Gifts from the Pavement, in one of two pop-up galleries on Victoria Road.

I posted a while ago about finding my ‘gifts’, the result of a kind of ‘beach-combing’ or pavement combing.  Farley & Roberts (see post on Edgelands) refer to this kind of collecting of objects: “This is not beachcombing, but edgecombing” (p154).  Saltaire, a World Heritage Site, can’t really be classed as an edgeland; it’s far too loved and looked after.  However, the discarded or ignored details that I’ve explored here are generally over-looked, so there is an edgelands quality to them.

Alice Fox Gifts from the Pavement layered rust, collagraph and screen print

My collection of ‘combed’ textures, marks and shapes found on the streets of Saltaire has been transformed into a series of long prints or sections of a path, which will form the main part of the exhibition.  As with other recent print-based work these are built up from various layers of different print techniques and texture:  There are rust prints from found metal objects; collagraph prints, some made with found items and some from paper but inspired by the textures and patterns found on the street (drain covers, worked stone etc.); mono-prints using some of the natural items I found (leaves and seed heads); screen prints featuring scraps of found text; hand stitch adding a further layer of texture to the surface and finally a layer of subtle texture, almost like a rubbing, that makes the surface even more pavement-like.  There are areas of intense activity as well as quieter sections.  This reflects the ‘activity’ on the streets: some stretches were rich in points of interest, others much ‘cleaner’.

Alice Fox Gifts from the Pavement Saltaire collagraph and screen print detail

In the run-up to the Arts Trail the Saltaire Tourist Information Centre has some ‘Pavement Pieces’ prints (like little fragments of the main ones) and cards.  I still don’t know exactly how the long prints will actually come together in the exhibition space until I get in there later in the week.  This is slightly nerve-racking but exciting too.  The book I’ve published to go with the exhibition is due for delivery on Monday and until I see it in print I won’t know if it really has worked how I hoped.  Although the work is all made there are unknowns and challenges for the week ahead.

installation

Alice Fox Spurn Cloth #2 at The Bowery, Leeds

This week I’ve been creating an installation at The Bowery in Leeds.  This is based on my long Spurn Cloth #2 but sees it displayed in a very different way to the previous venues it has visited.  Rather than hanging vertically the cloth is hung horizontally round half of the gallery room.  I have extended it using collaged rusted and printed paper so that the band of texture and marks forms a complete circle around the space.

Alice Fox Spurn Cloth #2 (extended) at The Bowery, Leeds

The paper is collaged directly onto the wall, something that I was quite nervous about doing. Having completed it, I’m really excited about how it has worked.  There is a kind of freedom to this  sort of site-specific work.  I don’t have to worry about pricing or whether anyone might want to buy it.  It can just be.

Alice Fox Textures of Spurn at The Bowery, Leeds

At the end of the exhibition the paper extension will then be scraped off the wall and will be no longer.  Just as Spurn itself is constantly changing shape, bits being eroded in one area and deposited in another, this installation has seen the original cloth extended, added to, enhanced.  And then, as if by the action of an exceptionally high tide, it will be taken away again.

Alice Fox Textures of Spurn installation at The Bowery, Leeds

My work is showing alongside a beautiful exhibition by Hannah.  The preview is this evening from 6-8pm (all welcome) and the exhibitions run until 5th July.